Resources
Make It Memorable (and Fun)!

“We did a great science worksheet today!” said no kid ever. As an educator, make a new school year resolution to be the one that “comes home to the dinner table” (in a good way of course)! Or, if you’re a home educator, make sure your lesson is comment worthy. We remember experiences. We remember doing things. We remember concepts when we can apply those concepts.

What better subject than science to make learning come alive? This month we offer some simple and very fun science activities that are guaranteed to make children look forward to coming to class and then telling others about what they have learned. But, it’s not just about the “wow” factor. It’s also important that the concepts learned are meaningful and robust.

So how do we start the new school year with a bang? Kids love a good joke and the thought of this activity (Arm Pit Fudge) sounds deliciously gross and funny. In the Fuddlebrook book, Bert’s Crazy Growth Concoction, children learn about healthy food choices (which fudge is decidedly not!) and how too much sugar can cause an energy crash. Then in the book, Freddie Plays a Joke, students learn about blood and how jokes can backfire.

But that’s not all. This month we offer a bonus, that, while not in these books, ties to both, along with the concept of friction, in The Sled Race. Watch our video to learn how to make armpit fudge. Instead of the conventional way of ingredient mixing, we use the friction and the heat of the human body—namely the armpit to do the work. It’s actually quite tasty and just gross enough to be wonderful to a young child!

The Fuddlebrook stories and activities are full of ways to make learning memorable. So what are you waiting for? It’s time for some educational, fun science!      

Posted: September 2, 2020

Experiments
Armpit Fudge

9/2/20

Instead of the conventional way of ingredient mixing, we use the friction and the heat of the human body - namely the armpit to do the work. It's actually quite tasty and just gross enough to be wonderful to a young child!

The Mysterious Leaning Can

8/5/20

Amaze your friends with this science “trick” that also teaches about the center of gravity. Who knew an empty soda can and some water could provide such fun!

Mrs. Wigglebum’s Sunny Surprise

7/1/20

In the book, A Bad Case of the Spots, Freddie learns that too much sun can be damaging to your skin.

 

Liza’s Moving Arrows

6/1/20

This illustrates how light can bend or refract. Our eyes refract light. Refractive errors are optical imperfections that prevent the eye from properly focusing light, causing blurred vision.

The Fuddlebrook Mystery Powder

5/1/20

Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective created by Scottish author, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. He uses forensic science as one of his methods for investigating crimes. In real life, some scientists work every day analyzing and solving crimes. In the book, Who Stole Herman Tweed? Mrs. Wigglebum’s students learn not to jump to conclusions without thoroughly analyzing all the evidence.