For a complete introduction and to get to know each Fuddlebrook story/concept, work your way across the main menu bar above. Have fun exploring, and please contact us with any questions you may have!

But that's not all. Check out the introductory video that explains why we created the Fuddlebrook School Science Series.

Resources

Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective created by Scottish author, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. He uses forensic science as one of his methods for investigating crimes. In real life, some scientists work every day analyzing and solving crimes. In the book, Who Stole Herman Tweed? Mrs. Wigglebum’s students learn not to jump to conclusions without thoroughly analyzing all the evidence.

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Enjoy these “colorful” rain drops by making your own rain shower in a cup.

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Recent News

Wow…we've just celebrated Herman Tweed's sixth birthday!  On April 23, 2016, we “officially” introduced Herman Tweed and the whole Fuddlebrook gang to the world. We kicked off with Who Stole Herman Tweed and still recommend this story as a great way to start the series.

But why begin with Who Stole Herman Tweed? In this story, Herman goes missing, and the students in Mrs. Wigglebum’s class have to solve the mystery using the science process skills. These include:

Observation: Science begins with observation. We observe using all five of our senses to gather information about an object or phenomenon. It can be a qualitative (Herman is fuzzy) or quantitative (Herman weighs two pounds). The more descriptive our observations are, the better we can communicate them.

Communication: We take our observations and ideas and talk, write, draw, make models, etc, to represent that idea to others.

Classification: We classify our observations into different categories, which helps us to not forget new information! We mostly categorize by similarities, differences, and how they relate to each other. 

Prediction:  What do we think happened? What might happen in the future? Predicting is all about what we think might be happening based on our observations above.

Inference: To infer, we connect all the dots above to make an explanation of our observations. This isn’t just a guess, and can be made from multiple observations!

Conclusion: We take everything above to form a logical outcome. What’s the conclusion of Who Stole Herman Tweed?  Well you’ll have to read to find out or we offer a special treat this month with Fuddlebrook co-author Terri Johnson reading the story for you! 

Then be a detective with Herman and try our fun activity Fuddlebrook Mystery Powder.

Enjoy!

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Off in the distance, you hear a soft rumble of thunder. Soon fat raindrops hit the ground. Then the wind picks up and rain slashes at the windows. Lightning flashes and thunder booms. Nature is at it again! In the book A Spring Thunderstorm, the students in Mrs. Wigglebum’s class learn about storms, thunder, and lightning, and the dangers that can be associated with these weather occurrences. Two of the most important ingredients for thunderstorm formation are unstable air and moisture.

Thunderstorms can occur year-round and at all hours. But they are most likely to happen in the spring and summer months and during the afternoon and evening hours. It is estimated that there are around 1,800 thunderstorms that occur across our planet every day. Every thunderstorm has lightning (which is what makes the thunder sound).

Since spring is a prime time for storms, take advantage of this teachable moment. Watch our video and make your own spring shower. Read the Fuddlebrook book, A Spring Thunderstorm, to learn more about storms and the dangers associated with them.

Here are some other teaching ideas:

Learn about cumulonimbus clouds (thunderheads) as well as other types of clouds, too. What types of weather does each indicate?

Crunch on a Wint ‘O Green Lifesaver® and make a lightening storm in your mouth! All you need is a mint, a mirror, and a dark room. Explain the science behind this and how it mimics lightening.

Research the inventions of Benjamin Franklin, including the lightening rod. How did he prove lightening was electricity?

Thousands of years ago philosophers such as Aristotle believed that thunder was caused by the collision of clouds. Research the role of thunder and lightning in mythology as well.

Fulminology is the term used to describe the study of lightning. Learn about types of lightning. For example, Green Elves, Red Sprites, and Blue Jets are three different types of high altitude lightning.

Discuss safety procedures in the event of a thunderstorm.

While we may experience spring thunderstorms or other extreme weather, know we’ve got it good compared to others. The worst thunderstorm area in the world is Kampala, the capital of Uganda.  Kampala has an average of 240 days with thunderstorms every year

And, just as storms can pop up, they also often quickly end. Read A Spring Thunderstorm to discover the surprise that awaits Herman after the clouds disappear. Have a happy and safe spring! 

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What people are saying

This new series marvelously succeeds in introducing young students to inquiry-based, experiential learning of scientific concepts that are age-appropriate. Moreover, students have the opportunity to explore story-based scientific concepts further through hands-on investigations.

--Teresa, Biology Ph.D; former elementary teacher, Springfield, MO

What people are saying

The thing I love most about the Fuddlebrook series is the connection aspect. Not only have the creators connected literacy and science, they have also provided opportunity for exploration of all areas of life. The dispositions and traits of the characters are consistent throughout the books and lead to discussions about friendship, bullying, loyalty, honesty, and humility. Fuddlebrook is "teaching the whole child by connecting to life."

--Carolyn, First Grade Teacher, Ozark, MO