For a complete introduction and to get to know each Fuddlebrook story/concept, work your way across the main menu bar above. Have fun exploring, and please contact us with any questions you may have!

But that's not all. Check out the introductory video that explains why we created the Fuddlebrook School Science Series.

Resources

Explore Earth’s layers, or horizons, in an easy, hands-on activity children are sure to enjoy. After building the model, eat this delicious snack.

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Enjoy these “colorful” rain drops by making your own rain shower in a cup.

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Recent News

Monday, April 22, is Earth Day, a time when we pause to reflect on our truly incredible planet. Learn some amazing facts about our home planet.

Did you know that Earth is the only planet in the Solar System not to be named after a mythical god? Instead the word "earth" can be used to mean a number of different things. It can simply mean "dirt." This may have been one of the earliest meanings. What do we stand on? If you are outside, you are often standing on dirt. Perhaps, people came to think of the whole area they were standing on as "dirt" or "earth." By the time people were speaking Old English, about one thousand years ago, "earth" could have already meant the world on which people lived. It took longer for "earth" to come to mean "Planet Earth." This happened about 1400 or so.

Despite our Earth being called "earth," meaning dirt, only about 30% of the surface is actually solid ground. The rest of the planet's surface is made up of water. From a distance, Earth would be the brightest of the planets. This is because sunlight is reflected off the planet's water.

What is even more amazing than this percentage, is that a single drop of liquid water has yet to be found on any other planet in the Solar System. In this regard, Earth is truly unique. Of course, water is necessary to sustain life.

Speaking of water, did you know our oceans hold nearly 20 million tons of gold? There is enough undissolved gold on the sea floor to give nine pounds to each person on Earth!

Scientists also believe Earth may have had two moons at one time. Now Earth has one moon, and its name is Luna. 

Instead of looking skyward, let’s take a look below the Earth’s surface. This month, our training video models what lies below our feet. Explore Earth’s layers, or horizons, in an easy, hands-on activity children are sure to enjoy. After building the model, eat this delicious snack.

Yes, our awesome Earth is truly amazing! Read the Fuddlebrook story, The Plant Warrior, to learn more. Remember, we only have one Earth so we all must strive to reuse, reduce, and recycle.                                                              

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Off in the distance, you hear a soft rumble of thunder. Soon fat raindrops hit the ground. Then the wind picks up and rain slashes at the windows. Lightning flashes and thunder booms. Nature is at it again! In the book A Spring Thunderstorm, the students in Mrs. Wigglebum’s class learn about storms, thunder, and lightning, and the dangers that can be associated with these weather occurrences. Two of the most important ingredients for thunderstorm formation are unstable air and moisture.

Thunderstorms can occur year-round and at all hours. But they are most likely to happen in the spring and summer months and during the afternoon and evening hours. It is estimated that there are around 1,800 thunderstorms that occur across our planet every day. Every thunderstorm has lightning (which is what makes the thunder sound).

Since spring is a prime time for storms, take advantage of this teachable moment. Watch our video and make your own spring shower. Read the Fuddlebrook book, A Spring Thunderstorm, to learn more about storms and the dangers associated with them.

Here are some other teaching ideas:

Learn about cumulonimbus clouds (thunderheads) as well as other types of clouds, too. What types of weather does each indicate?

Crunch on a Wint ‘O Green Lifesaver® and make a lightening storm in your mouth! All you need is a mint, a mirror, and a dark room. Explain the science behind this and how it mimics lightening.

Research the inventions of Benjamin Franklin, including the lightening rod. How did he prove lightening was electricity?

Thousands of years ago philosophers such as Aristotle believed that thunder was caused by the collision of clouds. Research the role of thunder and lightning in mythology as well.

Fulminology is the term used to describe the study of lightning. Learn about types of lightning. For example, Green Elves, Red Sprites, and Blue Jets are three different types of high altitude lightning.

Discuss safety procedures in the event of a thunderstorm.

While we may experience spring thunderstorms or other extreme weather, know we’ve got it good compared to others. The worst thunderstorm area in the world is Kampala, the capital of Uganda.  Kampala has an average of 240 days with thunderstorms every year

And, just as storms can pop up, they also often quickly end. Read A Spring Thunderstorm to discover the surprise that awaits Herman after the clouds disappear. Have a happy and safe spring! 

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What people are saying

This new series marvelously succeeds in introducing young students to inquiry-based, experiential learning of scientific concepts that are age-appropriate. Moreover, students have the opportunity to explore story-based scientific concepts further through hands-on investigations.

--Teresa, Biology Ph.D; former elementary teacher, Springfield, MO

What people are saying

The thing I love most about the Fuddlebrook series is the connection aspect. Not only have the creators connected literacy and science, they have also provided opportunity for exploration of all areas of life. The dispositions and traits of the characters are consistent throughout the books and lead to discussions about friendship, bullying, loyalty, honesty, and humility. Fuddlebrook is "teaching the whole child by connecting to life."

--Carolyn, First Grade Teacher, Ozark, MO